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25th July 2017 - Last Day of Term - school re-opens to Years 1 to 6 on Tuesday 5th September 2017
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South Wonston Primary School Together, we will nurture, inspire, challenge and achieve

Accessibility Policy

 

SOUTH WONSTON PRIMARY SCHOOL

ACCESSIBILITY POLICY

 

Introduction

This policy is drawn up in accordance with the planning duty in the Disability Discrimination Act 1995, as amended by the SEN and Disability Act 2001 (SENDA). It draws on the guidance set out in ‘’Accessible Schools: Planning to increase access to schools for disabled pupils’’, issued by DfES in July 2002.

 

Definition of Disability

Disability is defined by the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (DDA):

‘’A person has a disability if he or she has a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on his or her ability to carry out normal day to day activities.’’

 

Key Objective

To reduce and eliminate barriers to access to the curriculum and to full participation in the school community for pupils, and prospective pupils, staff, volunteers and visitors with a disability.

 

Principles

  • Compliance with the DDA is consistent with the school’s aims and single equalities policy, and the operation of the school’s SEN policy;
  • The school recognises its duty under the DDA (as amended by the SENDA):

 

  • Not to discriminate against disabled pupils in their admissions and exclusions, and provision of education and associated services
  • Not to treat disabled pupils less favourably
  • To take reasonable steps to avoid putting disabled pupils at a substantial disadvantage
  • To publish an Accessibility Plan.

 

  • In performing their duties, governors and staff will have regard to the Disability Rights Commission (DRC) Code of Practice (2002);

 

  • The school recognises and values parents’ knowledge of their child’s disability and its effect on his/her ability to carry out normal activities, and respects the parents’ and child’s right to confidentiality;

· The school provides all pupils with a broad and balanced curriculum, differentiated and adjusted to meet the needs

   of individual pupils and their preferred learning styles; and endorses the key principles in the National Curriculum

   2014 framework, which underpin the development of a more inclusive curriculum:

 

  • Setting suitable learning challenges
  • Responding to pupils’ diverse needs
  • Overcoming potential barriers to learning and assessment for individuals and groups of pupils.

 

Activity

 

  1. Education & related activities
  • The school will continue to seek and follow the advice of LEA services, such as specialist teacher advisers and SEN inspectors/advisers, and of appropriate health professionals from the local NHS trusts.
  • The school’s SENCO, in conjunction with class teachers, has the day-to-day responsibility for monitoring the progress and attainment of pupils with disabilities, and ensuring that reasonable adjustments are made to enable them to access the curriculum, and wider school activities. This may include the deployment of teaching assistants as appropriate to facilitate participation.
  • Staff will be provided with appropriate training to enable them to devise a curriculum which seeks to remove potential barriers to learning and addresses the needs of all pupils. The curriculum will also include opportunities to raise awareness of disability in order to promote understanding.

 

 

b) Physical environment

  • The school will take account of the needs of pupils and visitors with physical difficulties and sensory impairments when planning and undertaking future improvements and refurbishments of the site and premises.

 

In our school community this year (2016/17) we have 5 pupils with an EHCP and 51 pupils on the SEND register who all have Individual Pupil Support Plans. Parents of 74 children have notified the school that their child has a medical condition that could either affect their learning or their health. In the majority of cases, this is an intermittent or remediable medical condition such temporary hearing difficulties, allergies and asthma, or poor vision corrected· The school provides all pupils with a broad and balanced curriculum, differentiated and adjusted to meet the needs of individual pupils and their preferred learning styles; and endorses the key principles in the National Curriculum 2014 framework, which underpin the development of a more inclusive curriculum:

 

  • Setting suitable learning challenges
  • Responding to pupils’ diverse needs
  • Overcoming potential barriers to learning and assessment for individuals and groups of pupils.

 

Activity

 

  1. Education & related activities
  • The school will continue to seek and follow the advice of LEA services, such as specialist teacher advisers and SEN inspectors/advisers, and of appropriate health professionals from the local NHS trusts.
  • The school’s SENCO, in conjunction with class teachers, has the day-to-day responsibility for monitoring the progress and attainment of pupils with disabilities, and ensuring that reasonable adjustments are made to enable them to access the curriculum, and wider school activities. This may include the deployment of teaching assistants as appropriate to facilitate participation.
  • Staff will be provided with appropriate training to enable them to devise a curriculum which seeks to remove potential barriers to learning and addresses the needs of all pupils. The curriculum will also include opportunities to raise awareness of disability in order to promote understanding.

 

b) Physical environment

  • The school will take account of the needs of pupils and visitors with physical difficulties and sensory impairments when planning and undertaking future improvements and refurbishments of the site and premises.

 

In our school community this year (2016/17) we have 5 pupils with an EHCP and 51 pupils on the SEND register who all have Individual Pupil Support Plans. Parents of 74 children have notified the school that their child has a medical condition that could either affect their learning or their health. In the majority of cases, this is an intermittent or remediable medical condition such temporary hearing difficulties, allergies and asthma, or poor vision corrected
by glasses. We have 3 ‘looked after’ children and 13 children who speak English as an additional language.

 

 

 

c) Provision of information

 

  • The school will make itself aware of local services, including those provided through the LEA, for providing information in alternative formats when required or requested.

 

-Newsletters to parents are available electronically, via ParentMail in Word format in which the font and size of print can be altered to suit and on the website in PDF format which can be read by text readers.

-Most information is available electronically and can be converted to other appropriate formats.

-The calendar of dates is available in a visual format on the school website.

-Visual timetables are displayed in classrooms.

 

 

Action Plan

See Appendix 1.

 

 

Appendix A – Definitions of Disability

A person has a disability if he or she has a physical or mental impairment that is:

· substantial

· long term and

· has an adverse effect on his or her ability to carry out normal everyday activities

 

The definition is broad and includes a wide range of impairments, including learning disabilities, dyslexia, diabetes or epilepsy where the effect of the impairment on the person’s ability to carry out normal day to day activities is adverse, substantial and long term.

 

The definition can include a wide range of impairments such as:

· dyslexia

· autism

· speech and language impairments

· ADHD An impairment does not in itself mean a person is disabled. It is the effect on the person’s ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities that has to be considered.

 

Activities such as:

· mobility

· manual dexterity

· physical co-ordination

· continence

· ability to lift, carry or otherwise move everyday objects

· speech, hearing and eyesight

· memory or ability to concentrate, learn or understand

· perception of risk of physical danger

 

Some people are automatically covered by the definition: those with cancer, multiple sclerosis, HIV infection or a severe disfigurement.

 

Details of disability can be collected in the following ways:

· Pupils – from SEN register, medical record sheets and entry data sheets (SIMS)

· Parents/carers – from disclosure to the school or from data entry sheets.

· Staff – disclosure to the Headteacher in confidence.

 

Disability information can be grouped according to type:

Type of disability

Including

Comments

Physical impairment

Mobility difficulties, limb malformation, missing limb

 

Sensory impairment

Sight and hearing impairment

Sight problems corrected with glasses or lenses do not qualify

Learning Difficulty, including Specific Learning Difficulty

Dyslexia, dyscalculia and dyspraxia

 

Medical condition

Diabetes, arthritis, cancer, depression and many other conditions which require long term treatment

 

Social, emotional and behavioural difficulties

Behaviour and emotional differences which impact on daily life such as ADHD, ASD and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

 

Speech and language

Development delay or physical difficulties leading to additional Speech and Language needs

 

 

 

 

 

 

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